Splitting a module from a python app

My OSPF checker is getting a bit big. The majority of the code is the function that parses the OSPF output and returns the required values.

I’d like to continue to refine what it can pull out. I’d also like to check non-IOS devices like Junos and IOS-XR output.

A function can very easily be moved into a new file and then called as a module. The great thing about this is that others can use the same module in different applications of their own. I can also create a separate module per OS that I’m interested in. Each can be edited separately.

The IOS OSPF checker has now been split into it’s own module like so:

import re
import sys

def ospf_information(i):
    int_list = {}
    ospf = re.split(r'[\n](?=GigabitEthernet|FastEthernet|Serial|Tunnel|Loopback|Dialer|BVI|Vlan|Virtual-Access)',i)
    print(ospf)
    for o in ospf:
        properties = {}
        interface =  re.search(r'(GigabitEthernet|FastEthernet|Serial|Tunnel|Loopback|Dialer|BVI|Vlan|Virtual-Access)[0-9]{1,4}/?[0-9]{0,4}.
?[0-9]{0,4}/?[0-9]{0,3}/?[0-9]{0,3}/?[0-9]{0,3}:?[0-9]{0,3}',o)
        if not interface:
            continue
        interface = interface.group()
        ip = re.search(r'(\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}/\d{1,2})',o)
        if not ip:
            ip = re.search(r'Interface is unnumbered. Using address of [a-zA-Z]{1,10}[0-9]{1,5}/?[0-9]{0,5}.?[0-9]{0,5}',o)
            properties['IP'] = ip.group()
        else:
            properties['IP'] = ip.group()
        a = re.search(r'Area ([\s]{0,3}[0-9]{1,5})',o)
        properties['Area'] = a.group(1)
        n = re.search(r'Network Type ([\s]{0,3}[a-zA-Z_]{0,20})',o)
        properties['Net'] = n.group(1)
        c = re.search(r'Cost: ([0-9]{1,5})',o)
        properties['Cost'] = c.group(1)
        s = re.search(r'line protocol is[\s]([a-zA-Z]{1,4})',o)
        properties['Status'] = s.group(1)
        p = re.search(r'Passive',o)
        if p:
            properties['Neigh'] = "Passive Interface"
            properties['Adj'] = None
        else:
            ne = re.search(r'(?:Neighbor Count is )([0-9]{1,3})',o)
            if not ne:
                properties['Neigh'] = None
            else:
                properties['Neigh'] = ne.group(1)
            ad = re.search(r'(?:Adjacent neighbor count is )([0-9]{1,3})',o)
            if not ad:
                properties['Adj'] = None
            else:
                properties['Adj'] = ad.group(1)
        h = re.search(r'Hello ([0-9]{1,3})',o)
        if not h:
            properties['Hello'] = None
        else:
            properties['Hello'] = h.group(1)
        d = re.search(r'Dead ([0-9]{1,3})',o)
        if not d:
            properties['Dead'] = None
        else:
            properties['Dead'] = d.group(1)
        int_list[interface]=properties
    return int_list

if __name__ == "__main__":
    f = open(sys.argv[1])
    info = f.read()
    f.close()
    ospf = ospf_information(info)
    print("This device contains "+str(len(ospf))+" ospf enabled interfaces")
    print(ospf)

A couple of things to note here. The module now returns a dictionary. This allows any app using this module to easily extract whatever values it chooses instead of iterating through a list. The last section of code allows me to run the module directly against some raw router output directly to pull information out. This part is not run if calling as a module.

In my main application I now simply import the module and change how I call it slightly:

import ospfios
 ospf_int = ospfios.ospf_information(output)

I’ve started a preliminary Junos OSPF module which will return similar values:

import re
import sys

def ospf_information(i):
    int_list = {}
    ospf = re.split(r'[\n](?=ge|fe|lo|ae|et|fxp)',i)
    for o in ospf:
        properties = {}
        interface =  re.search(r'(ge|fe|lo|ae|et|fxp)([0-9]?)([-]?){0,1}[0-9]{1,5}/?[0-9]{0,5}/?[0-9]{0,5}/?[0-9]?[.][0-9]{1,5}',o)
        if not interface:
            continue
        interface = interface.group()
        ip = re.search(r'Address: (\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3})',o)
        properties['IP'] = ip.group(1)
        c = re.search(r'Cost: ([0-9]{1,5})',o)
        properties['Cost'] = c.group(1)
        ad = re.search(r'(?:Adj count: )([0-9]{1,3})',o)
        properties['Adj'] = ad.group(1)
        h = re.search(r'Hello: ([0-9]{1,3})',o)
        properties['Hello'] = h.group(1)
        d = re.search(r'Dead: ([0-9]{1,3})',o)
        properties['Dead'] = d.group(1)
        int_list[interface]=properties
    return int_list

if __name__ == "__main__":
    f = open(sys.argv[1])
    info = f.read()
    f.close()
    ospf = ospf_information(info)
    print("This device contains "+str(len(ospf))+" ospf enabled interfaces")
    print(ospf)

A quick run directly on a small Junos box:

[email protected]:~/git/ospf_checker$ python3 ospfjunos.py junos.txt
This device contains 4 ospf enabled interfaces
{'ge-1/3/0.641': {'IP': '10.11.31.227', 'Cost': '10', 'Adj': '1', 'Hello': '10', 'Dead': '40'}, 'lo0.0': {'IP': '10.11.225.224', 'Cost': '0', 'Adj': '0', 'Hello': '10', 'Dead': '40'}, 'ge-0/0/0.643': {'IP': '10.11.31.90', 'Cost': '10', 'Adj': '1', 'Hello': '10', 'Dead': '40'}, 'ge-0/2/0.644': {'IP': '10.11.31.94', 'Cost': '10', 'Adj': '1', 'Hello': '10', 'Dead': '40'}}

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